Essays on marvin gaye

I am an art director/graphic designer who specializes in music. For the last twenty years under the name “A Man Called Wrycraft” I’ve designed around 460 albums, hundreds of posters and other musical ephemera — occasionally winning awards, all the time playing like a small boy in art class. lt’s been a real treat doing graphic design for Folk Alliance International (A non-profit organization that fosters and promotes Folk, Roots, Blues & World Musics) over the last 16 years. Creating something different each year for their annual conference without repeating visual themes has been a challenge and a lot of fun.

The scene is directed so that the audience wants it to happen, needs it to happen. Ness says at the beginning that he will do anything “within the law” to destroy Capone’s grip on the city; the point of his character is that as he gets to know himself better he learns he’ll do more. This is too programmatic. The way Mamet designs his celebration of law enforcement, Ness’s giving in to his vengeful impulse completes the plan. It’s what is supposed to show that he’s human—that he’s grown. For some of us, this takes the air right out of his actions, and he’s left a little wooden. Mamet doesn’t allow the characters enough free will. But, in an impressive, four-square way, he fills out the audience’s expectations. He gives you revenge—an eye for an eye—and makes it seem just and righteous. It’s a relief when the film doesn’t take itself so seriously—when it tosses in such burlesque stunts as a judge’s ordering a jury that Capone has suborned to switch places with the jury in the courtroom next door, and then has Capone’s counsel changing his client’s plea from not guilty to guilty without consulting him. It’s as if the stern Mamet had left the room and the kids were playing.

Despite its chart success, I Want You received mixed reviews from music critics at the time of its release. [2] It has been noted by music writers that the critical reception of disco music in general had been poor and ill-considered, which may have caused the slightly disco-styled I Want You to suffer critically, in comparison to Gaye's previous albums. [2] Los Angeles Times writer Dennis Hunt called the album "disappointing" and "only partially commendable". [20] Rolling Stone ' s Vince Aletti criticized Leon Ware's production for being too low- key , and perceived that Gaye lacks the certain passion in his lyricism and singing from his previous records. [21] Aletti compared the album to Gaye's previous work, writing that "Gaye seems determined to take over as soul's master philosopher in the bedroom, a position that requires little but an affectation of constant, rather jaded horniness. The pose has already been established in Let's Get It On , on which Gaye was hot, tender, aggressive, soothing and casually raunchy—the modern lover with all his contradictions. I Want You continues in the same vein but with only the faintest traces of the robust passion that shot through and sustained the earlier album ... one expects something with a little more substance and spirit. But there's no fire here, only a well-concealed pilot light." [21]

Though the ascents of Dan Bejar and Neko Case would retroactively validate the "supergroup" tag, the New Pornographers began their life more like a ragtag musicians' roundtable, a small group of upstarts and veterans brimming with talent and mutual respect. Yes, Mass Romantic has enough breezy power-pop hooks to fill five or so lesser records. But the real magic of Mass Romantic lies in Carl Newman's uncanny ability to craft a cohesive record without diluting the personalities at hand-- note how Newman picks up a submissive falsetto to complement Case's lead vocal in "Letter From an Occupant", and how Bejar's staggered phrasing is maintained even as "Breakin' the Law" is transformed from hushed acoustic demo into fist-pumping album closer. The band would go on to release a string of similarly catchy records, but Mass Romantic is their most charmingly character-driven piece. --Matt LeMay

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Essays on marvin gaye

essays on marvin gaye

Though the ascents of Dan Bejar and Neko Case would retroactively validate the "supergroup" tag, the New Pornographers began their life more like a ragtag musicians' roundtable, a small group of upstarts and veterans brimming with talent and mutual respect. Yes, Mass Romantic has enough breezy power-pop hooks to fill five or so lesser records. But the real magic of Mass Romantic lies in Carl Newman's uncanny ability to craft a cohesive record without diluting the personalities at hand-- note how Newman picks up a submissive falsetto to complement Case's lead vocal in "Letter From an Occupant", and how Bejar's staggered phrasing is maintained even as "Breakin' the Law" is transformed from hushed acoustic demo into fist-pumping album closer. The band would go on to release a string of similarly catchy records, but Mass Romantic is their most charmingly character-driven piece. --Matt LeMay

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