The essays of arthur schopenhauer the wisdom of life

In March 1942 Koestler was assigned to the Ministry of Information , where he worked as a scriptwriter for propaganda broadcasts and films. [24] In his spare time he wrote Arrival and Departure , the third in his trilogy of novels that included Darkness at Noon . He also wrote several essays, which were subsequently collected and published in The Yogi and the Commissar . One of the essays, titled "On Disbelieving Atrocities" (originally published in the New York Times ), [25] was about Nazi atrocities against the Jews.

If surpluses are used in charity, or in cooperatives for human purposes such as home-building for the less affluent, life necessarily becomes simpler and the ideal of voluntary poverty cannot be far behind. The Christian doctrine of property becomes a reality, namely the retaining of a sufficiency of goods for an adequate life and the sharing of the remainder with the needy. In point of fact, millions of Christians, working for wages, actually live out this teaching on property. How else do we explain the world-wide network of the works of mercy supported by the small gifts of the many, Though there are Catholic millionaires, the masses of Catholics are rather the victims than the beneficiaries of corporations as they roam about the world seeking profits.

For, if it is true to say that in essence the tragic hero is intent upon claiming his whole due as a personality, and if this struggle must be total and without reservation, then it automatically demonstrates the indestructible will of man to achieve his humanity. The possibility of victory must be there in tragedy. Where pathos rules, where pathos is finally derived, a character has fought a battle he could not possibly have won. The pathetic is achieved when the protagonist is, by virtue of his witlessness, his insensitivity or the very air he gives off, incapable of grappling with a much superior force. Pathos truly is the mode for the pessimist. But tragedy requires a nicer balance between what is possible and what is impossible. And it is curious, although edifying, that the plays we revere, century after century, are the tragedies. In them, and in them alone, lies the belief--optimistic, if you will, in the perfectibility of man. It is time, I think, that we who are without kings, took up this bright thread of our history and followed it to the only place it can possible lead in our time--the heart and spirit of the average man.

Mahanirvana Tantra
The Tantra of the Great Liberation: Translated by Arthur Avalon (Sir John Woodroffe ) [ 1913 ]
The best known of the Tantric scriptures. It was translated by Sir John Woodruffe (under the pseudonym 'Arthur Avalon'), one of the few Indologists to gain direct access to this obscure and secretive branch of Hinduism. Framed as a conversation between the god Shiva and goddess Shaki, this text describes the chakra, or subtle energy structure of the human body, ceremonies, yogic practices and mantras for meditation, and a summary of the Hindu laws ( dharma ) regarding sexual behavior.

Another sign of his rising fortunes was the publication in 1923 of a collected edition of his works (the "Caerleon Edition") and a bibliography. That year also saw the publication of a recently completed second volume of autobiography, Things Near and Far —the third and final volume, The London Adventure , being published in 1924. Machen's earlier works suddenly started becoming much-sought-after collectors' items at this time, a position they have held ever since. In 1924 he issued a collection of bad reviews of his own work, with very little commentary, under the title Precious Balms . In this period of prosperity Machen's home saw many visitors and social gatherings, and Machen made new friends such as Oliver Stonor .

The essays of arthur schopenhauer the wisdom of life

the essays of arthur schopenhauer the wisdom of life

Mahanirvana Tantra
The Tantra of the Great Liberation: Translated by Arthur Avalon (Sir John Woodroffe ) [ 1913 ]
The best known of the Tantric scriptures. It was translated by Sir John Woodruffe (under the pseudonym 'Arthur Avalon'), one of the few Indologists to gain direct access to this obscure and secretive branch of Hinduism. Framed as a conversation between the god Shiva and goddess Shaki, this text describes the chakra, or subtle energy structure of the human body, ceremonies, yogic practices and mantras for meditation, and a summary of the Hindu laws ( dharma ) regarding sexual behavior.

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